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Thirteenth International Symposium on Human Aspects of Information Security & Assurance (HAISA 2019)

Thirteenth International Symposium on Human Aspects of Information Security & Assurance (HAISA 2019)
Nicosia, Cyprus, July 15-16, 2019
ISBN: 978-0244-19096-5

Title: Public Thoughts on Tackling Digital Crime in Society and by Law Enforcement
Author(s): Georgina Humphries
Reference: pp89-98
Keywords: Cyber Security, Digital Forensics, Cyber Crime, Human Behaviour, Public Perception
Abstract: With the ownership of connected digital devices standing at 3 for the average user, the ubiquity of the Internet and the rise in smarter Internet-connected devices, there is an inevitable increase in the rise of digital crime associated with such devices. Well-known is the under-reporting of cybercriminal activities by victims which may give a green light for continued online criminal activities. Yet, there is little focus on the wider public’s perception on what needs to be tackled in relation to digital and online crimes; this paper examines and discusses the views of 102 questionnaire responses from public participants. Questions and responses focused on societal challenges surrounding digital technologies and the perception of law enforcement’s role in digital and online crimes. Crimes described or listed by participants are coded into themes addressing participant concerns surrounding digital crime. This study also discusses those participants who identified as ‘victims of digital crime’ (n=25) and offers them to share the actions they took as well as any outcomes. This study found nearly a quarter of respondents have been a victim of dishonest or unlawful behaviour online. This paper speculates how some criminal activities may be under-reported due to lack of awareness alongside the underappreciation for the extent and spread of such crimes. Results show that participants were heavily focused on crimes such as, theft, fraud and those involving children.
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